Thursday, September 27, 2018

Top Best Allama Iqbal Quotes | Saying

Allama Iqbal Quotes:







Sir Muhammad Iqbal Bio

Sir Muhammad Iqbal, also known as Allama Iqbal, was a philosopher, poet and politician in British India who is widely regarded to have inspired the Pakistan Movement. He is considered one of the most important figures in Urdu literature, with literary work in both the Urdu and Persian languages. Iqbal is admired as a prominent classical poet by Pakistani, Indian and other international scholars of literature. Although most well known as a poet, he has also been acclaimed as a modern Muslim philosopher.

 His first poetry book, Asrar-e-Khudi, appeared in the Persian language in 1915, and other books of poetry include Rumuz-i-Bekhudi, Payam-i-Mashriq and Zabur-i-Ajam. Some of his most well known Urdu works are Bang-i-Dara, Bal-i-Jibril and Zarb-i Kalim. Along with his Urdu and Persian poetry, his various Urdu and English lectures and letters have been very influential in cultural, social, religious and political disputes over the years. In 1922, he was knighted by King George V, giving him the title "Sir".

During his years of studying law and philosophy in England, Iqbal became a member of the London branch of the All India Muslim League. Later, in one of his most famous speeches, Iqbal pushed for the creation of a Muslim state in Northwest India. This took place in his presidential speech in the league's December 1930 was very close to Quid-i-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah. Iqbal is known as Shair-e-Mushriq meaning Poet of the East. He is also called Muffakir-e-Pakistan "The Inceptor of Pakistan", and Hakeem-ul-Ummat "The Sage of the Ummah". Pakistan has officially recognised him as its "national poet".

 In Iran and Afghanistan he is famous as Iqbal-e Lahori (Iqbal of Lahore), and he is most appreciated for his Persian work. His birthday is celebrated on November 9 and is a holiday in Pakistan Iqbal was born in Sialkot, within the Punjab Province of British India (now in Pakistan). Iqbal ancestors were kashmiri Pandits, the Brahmins from Kashmir who converted to Islam. In the 19th century, when Sikh were taking over rule of Kashmir, his grandfather's family migrated to Punjab. Iqbal often mentioned and reminisced about his Kashmiri Pandit Brahmin lineage in his writings.

 Iqbal's father, Shaikh Noor Mohammad, was a tailor, not formally educated but a religious man. Iqbal's mother Imam Bibi was a polite and humble woman who helped the poor and solved the problems of neighbours. She died on November 9, 1914 in Sialkot. Iqbal loved his mother, and on her death he expressed his feelings of pathos in a poetic form elegy. "Who would wait for me anxiously in my native place? Who would display restlessness if my letter fails to arrive? I will visit thy grave with this complaint: Who will now think of me in midnight prayers? All thy life thy love served me with devotion— When I became fit to serve thee, thou hast departed."

 When Iqbal was four years old, he was sent to the mosque to learn the Quran. Later, Syed Mir Hassan, the head of the Madrassa in Sialkot, became his teacher. Iqbal received the Faculty of Arts diploma from Scotch Mission College in 1895, where his teacher Hassan was the professor of Arabic. In the same year Iqbal married Karim Bibi, the daughter of a Gujrati physician Khan Bahadur Ata Muhammad Khan, through a first arranged marriage. They had daughter Miraj Begum and son Aftab Iqbal. Later Iqbal's second marriage was with Sardar Begum mother of Javid Iqbal and third marriage with Mukhtar Begum in December 1914. During first marriage at the same time, Iqbal also began to study philosophy, English literature and Arabic in Lahore's Government college. He graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree.

Allama Iqbal Quotes


Allama Iqbal Quotes

1.People who have no hold over their process of thinking ara likely to be ruined by liberty of thought.

2.The alchemist of the West has turned stone into glass But my alchemy has transmuted glass into flint Pharaohs of today have stalked me in vain

3.The ultimate aim of the ego is not to see something, but to be something.

4.Words, without power, is mere philosophy.

5.People who have no hold over their process of thinking are likely to be ruined by liberty of thought. If thought is immature, liberty of thought becomes a method of converting men into animals.

6.When truth has no burning, then it is philosophy, when it gets burning from the heart, it becomes poetry.

7.Rise above sectional interests and private ambitions... Pass from matter to spirit. Matter is diversity; spirit is light, life and unity.

8.Islam is itself destiny and will not suffer destiny.

9.Destiny is the prison and chain of the ignorant. Understand that destiny like the water of the Nile: Water before the faithful, blood before the unbeliever.

10.Be not entangled in this world of days and nights; Thou hast another time and space as well.

11.I lead no party; I follow no leader. I have given the best part of my life to careful study of Islam, its law and polity, its culture, its history and its literature.

12.A wrong concept misleads the understanding; a wrong deed degrades the whole man, and may eventually demolish the structure of the human ego.

13.It is true that we are made of dust. And the world is also made of dust. But the dust has motes rising.

14.Man is primarily governed by passion and instinct.

15.Plants and minerals are bound to predestination. The faithful is only bound to the Divine orders.

20.The wing of the Falcon brings to the king, the wing if the crow brings him to the cemetery.

21.Nations are born in the hearts of poets, they prosper and die in the hands of politicians.

22.Divine life is in touch with the whole universe on the analogy of the soul's contact with the body.

23.The ultimate purpose of religious life is to make this evolution move in a direction far more important to the destiny of the ego than the moral health of the social fabric which forms his present environment.

24.Since love first made the breast an instrument Of fierce lamenting, by its flame my heart Was molten to a mirror, like a rose I pluck my breast apart, that I may hang This mirror in your sight.

25.Vision without power does bring moral elevation but cannot give a lasting culture.

26.The possibility of a scientific treatment of history means a wider experience, a greater maturity of practical reason, and finally a fuller realization of certain basic ideas regarding the nature of life and time.

27.The new world is as yet behind the veil of destiny In my eyes, however its dawn has been unveiled

28.The new world is as yet behind the veil of destiny In my eyes, however its dawn has been unveiled

30.I am a hidden meaning made to defy. The grasp of words, and walk away With free will and destiny. As living, revolutionary clay.

31.Though the terror of the sea gives to none security, in the secret of the shell. Self preserving we may dwell.

32.The thought of a limit to perceptual space and time staggers the mind.

33.If faith is lost, there is no security and there is no life for him who does not adhere to religion.

34.The Ego is partly free. partly determined, and reaches fuller freedom by approaching the Individual who is most free: God.

35.Another way of judging the value of a prophet's religious experience, therefore, would be to examine the type of manhood that he has created, and the cultural world that has sprung out of the spirit of his message.

36.From love's plectrum arises the song of the string of life Love is the light of life love is the fire of life

37.But the universe, as a collection of finite things, presents itself as a kind of island situated in a pure vacuity to which time, regarded as a series of mutually exclusive moments, is nothing and does nothing.

38.God is not a dead equation!

39.But the universe, as a collection of finite things, presents itself as a kind of island situated in a pure vacuity to which time, regarded as a series of mutually exclusive moments, is nothing and does nothing.

40.The standpoint of the man who relies on religious experience for capturing Reality must always remain individual and incommunicable.

41.Ends and purposes, whether they exist as conscious or subconscious tendencies, form the wrap and woof of our conscious experience.

42.I have seen the movement of the sinews of the sky, And the blood coursing in the veins of the moon.

43.The soul is neither inside nor outside the body; neither proximate to nor separate from it.

44.My ancestors were Brahmins. They spent their lives in search of god. I am spending my life in search of man.

45.It is the lot of man to share in the deeper aspirations of the universe around him and to share his own destiny as well as that of the universe, now by adjusting himself to its forces, now by putting the whole of his energy to his own ends and purposes.

46.Thou art not for the earth, nor for the Heaven the world is for thee, thou art not for the world.

47.Become dust - and they will throw thee in the air; Become stone - and they will throw thee on glass.

48.It is the nature of the self to manifest itself, In every atom slumbers the might of the self.

49.Why should I ask the wise men: Whence is my beginning? I am busy with the thought: Where will be my end?

50.The immediacy of mystic experience simply means that we know God just as we know other objects. God is not a mathematical entity or a system of concepts mutually related to one another and having no reference to experience.










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